Massachusetts middle schooler charged after throwing hot noodles in teacher’s face, leaving her in ‘excruciating pain’

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  • A Massachusetts student has been charged after he was accused of throwing hot ramen noodles in the face of a teacher.

  • The incident left the teacher with “minor burns”, local news reported.

  • The teacher said she took herself for treatment and the school never called the police.

A Boston, Massachusetts teenager has been charged after throwing hot ramen noodles in a teacher’s face earlier this month, according to multiple reports.

The unidentified student has been charged with aggravated assault as a minor in connection with the incident at McKinley Middle School on May 5. NBCBoston reported.

According to the outlet, local police said the teacher told the student not to put a textbook in the microwave when reheating his noodles during lunch.

the The Boston Herald reported that the teacher tried to take the book from the teenager, but he took it back. The exchange prompted the 14-year-old to then pour the cup of heated noodles over the teacher, according to the report.

According to a police report reviewed by McClatchy Newsthe incident left the teacher in “excruciating pain” and the school nurse advised her to seek medical attention for her injuries, which were on the left side of her face.

The police report said the victim, who went to the hospital, had “minor swelling, pain and burning” on his cheek, according to the outlet.

NBC Boston reported that the teacher told police she told the school principal about the incident and was told she would contact authorities. However, the school would never have done that.

“Measures have been taken to ensure the safety of the staff member involved, and appropriate interventions have taken place,” Boston Public Schools told McClatchy News in a statement.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu addressed the situation on Friday, NBC Boston reported, calling it “unacceptable.”

“It is unacceptable for any of our students or educators to feel worried or stressed about anything other than coming to school and caring for our young people,” she said. said, according to the outlet.

Read the original article at Initiated

Martha K. Merrill